Useful ideas for gardening

Expert Advice About Organic Gardening And You

 

 

Plants are often grown best in their native environments. This article helps to list many of the benefits of growing native plants, and the way that foreign plants react to certain environments. Based on many factors of growth, such as light and soil acidity, it may be wise to look into artificial environments, greenhouses or indoor growing of specific plants.

When boiling or steaming vegetables, keep the water that the vegetables were cooked in and let it cool. Use the water to water the garden with. It is packed with all the vitamins and minerals that were in the vegetables when they were cooked and will help the plants grow as a natural plant food.

Grow vegetables and fruits to drink. Often overlooked yet easy to grow are items that can be made into fantastic and nutritious drinks. These berries and fruit juices can be frozen or canned or made into wine and hard cider. A well made apple wine or blueberry wine can start at $10-12 a bottle, so this can also be a profit available with the garden.

Have your soil analyzed by a laboratory for a small fee so that you know which nutrients you need to add. Many college agricultural departments or cooperative extensions will provide this service for just a few dollars. Once you have the report, head to a farm supply company and buy what you need.

If you have specimen plants which need warmer climate zones than the rest of your garden, you can easily create a suitable space for them within your regular garden! Just create a shelter with a south facing wall which will become a solar collector, absorbing warmth in the day and releasing it at night, thus providing your specimen plants with the perfect environment!

A good idea when gardening is to keep a record of progress. If it is a journal form or photographic form of recording the progress of the garden is helpful for the years to come. Recording which types of plants work well, which did not work or what types of soil can help future gardens start without any trial and error of previous years.

Keep interested in gardening by trying something new each year. While tried and true favorites will always be a part of the garden, reserve a part for something new and exciting to keep interest. Keep in mind that some trial and error will be required because one crop that will be a flop in the fall, might be an excellent crop in the spring.

Start a compost bin, and enjoy nutrient-rich fertilizer that you can use for your vegetable plants, herbs, flowers and more. Food scraps and peels, coffee grounds, eggshells, newspaper, paperboard, yard waste and other organic matter are perfect additions to your compost bin. Keep a small bucket or bag in your freezer as an odor-free way to collect kitchen waste, and empty the container into the outdoor bin when it is full.

To reiterate from this article, it’s generally best to grow native plants in their native lands. This applies to grass, trees, fruits and vegetables and even, some herbs. Plant life has adapted over millions of years to best suit its environment, whether it be through frost-resistant stems or competitive uptake of minerals. Understanding the basics of these evolutionary advancements can benefit, even the amateur gardener.